FOSAF FLYFISHING REPORTS - Trout - Western Cape

Date of Report: Thursday, 24th May 2018
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Name: Tim Rolston
Email: rolston@iafrica.com
Phone: 083 626 0467

Rain, we had some rain!! Not a lot but enough to raise the water levels more than a bit and to apparently switch the trout onto the bite a little as well.  Whilst through the hottest and driest months focus has been more on the Elandspad the upper sections at least of the Smalblaar are fishing very well after the influx of some fresh water. Recently a good hatch of large mayflies brought fish to the top instantly , although alas the action was rather short lived. But certainly the fishing has picked up, although you may have to endure slightly more chilly conditions on the water. The main reason for that however isn’t so much the temperatures as the early loss of sunshine as the low sun disappears behind the mountains on some sections hours before official dusk. With that in mind, an extra jersey or a windcheater in the backpack isn’t a bad idea, wet and in the sun isn’t the same as wet and in the shade as you are likely to rapidly discover.

Flows are such that both dry fly and nymph fishing is effective, partly depending on the stretch of water and with the higher flows one can get away with and perhaps even profit from fishing larger patterns than one was using a month ago.

As we head into winter the Stillwater scene generally starts to liven up and certainly reports from Lakenvlei indicate some good fishing and some good fish. This is particularly welcome news as last season there were concerns that the fishery was in decline. Stocking has obviously helped but hopefully this premiere water is heading back to former glory. Many of the fish are still being taken relatively deep and one suspects that some or even most of the fish are feeding on daphnia, that means you are strongly recommended to have at least one orange fly on your leader.

One can barely say that the river season is ending and the Stillwater one starting “with a bang”, but there are some encouraging signs after the dog days of summer.