Flyfishing report: Saltwater - Upper South Coast

Date of Report: Wednesday, 19th January 2022
Name: Martin Smuts
Email: smutsfalcon@gmail.com
Phone: 078 9620111

It always pleases me to see more and more fly fishermen out on our local waters. This gives us the opportunity to meet like-minded people and exchange ideas, tactics etc. Ever increasing our pool of shared knowledge, without which we, myself personally, would have had little success in our fly fishing journeys.

Durban Harbour has seen some familiar catches recently. Besides the likes of Sand Gurnard and small Needlescale Queenfish, a good number of a dozen or so Kingies, including GT's, Greenspot and Bigeye, have been caught on fly in the past two months. Most fish were caught on the low and incoming tides while wading the sand banks and fishing the drop offs. Various flies worked like a charm including Flippers, Charlies and Shrimp patterns. The average size fish caught on fly recently has been on the rather small side, averaging just under 30cm in length. Social media reports show recent catches of various Kingfish species on spinning gear, the size of these fish just goes to show that there are bigger kingfish in the harbour and it is just a matter of time before a Big Kingfish is landed on fly.

According to the word on the sandbanks, if you are looking for a very long and very hard fight on fly gear in Durban Harbour, then look no further than the various species of Rays that have made the harbour their home. On the incoming tide, they can sometimes be seen moving in to feed over the recently flooded sandbanks. Be prepared for fights to last up to and over half an hour. So, bring your big guns when targeting Rays, 12 weights are best suited for the job, 10 weights are probably as light as you want to go, with anything lighter putting you at a serious disadvantage and chances of you stopping and landing your Ray become very unlikely.

If you would like to have your catch mentioned in this report, please feel free to contact me on the above details. Until next time, tight lines.

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